Parashat Ha’Azinu: Delving into the Depths – 18 Kabbalistic Insights

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Lesson 1: Deuteronomy 32:1-3

“Give ear, O heavens, and I will speak; and let the earth hear the words of my mouth. My doctrine shall drop as the rain; my speech shall distill as the dew, as the small rain upon the tender grass, and as the showers upon the herb. Because I will proclaim the name of HaShem; ascribe greatness to our God.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The opening of Parashat Ha’Azinu calls upon the heavens and the earth as witnesses. This is not a mere poetic expression. Rashi, in his commentary on Deuteronomy 30:19 (Parashat Nitzavim), explains that the heavens and the earth are eternal, and by invoking them as witnesses, the Torah ensures that the covenant between Israel and HaShem will be eternal as well.

Understanding:

The metaphor of the doctrine as rain and speech as dew indicates the essential nature of Torah for the world. Just as rain is necessary for physical sustenance, the Torah is necessary for spiritual sustenance. In the Talmud, Ta’anit 7a, our Sages tell us: “Just as the world cannot survive without dew, so too it cannot survive without Torah.” This illustrates the deep interconnectedness between the physical and spiritual realms.

Secrets:

In Kabbalistic teachings, especially as per the Zohar (2:63b), the concept of dew is linked to the sefirah of Yesod, which serves as a conduit for divine blessings to flow into our world. The dew, representing the Torah in this context, connects the heavenly wisdom (Binah) to the earthly realm (Malkhut), ensuring a continuous flow of divine nourishment.

Proofs:

  • Rashi on Deuteronomy 30:19.
  • Talmud, Tractate Ta’anit 7a.
  • Zohar, 2:63b.

Lesson 2: Deuteronomy 32:4-6

“He is the Rock, His work is perfect; for all His ways are judgment; a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is He. They have corrupted themselves, their spot is not the spot of His children; they are a perverse and crooked generation. Do you thus requite HaShem, O foolish people and unwise? Is not He your Father who has bought you? He has made you and established you.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The description of HaShem as “the Rock” is profound. In the Talmud, Chagigah 16a, the world is described as being founded upon one stone, the “eben shetiyyah” or foundation stone. This represents the core truth of the world and the firmness of HaShem’s promises.

Understanding:

The juxtaposition in these verses, where HaShem’s perfection is contrasted with the imperfection of the Israelites, speaks volumes about the human condition. The Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’Azinu 3, points out the irony here: despite the unwavering perfection of HaShem, His children turn away, reflecting their own imperfections back to Him.

Secrets:

Kabbalistically, the word “Rock” (Tzur) hints at the sefirah of Tiferet, the heart of the Tree of Life, representing compassion and balance. It bridges Chesed (loving-kindness) and Gevurah (severity). By identifying HaShem as the Rock, the Torah is highlighting His balanced nature, acting both in mercy and justice, according to the deeds of humanity.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Tractate Chagigah 16a.
  • Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’Azinu 3.

Lesson 3: Deuteronomy 32:7-9

“Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations; ask your father, and he will show you; your elders, and they will tell you. When the Most High gave to the nations their inheritance, when He separated the children of Adam, He set the borders of the peoples according to the number of the children of Israel. For HaShem’s portion is His people; Jacob is the lot of His inheritance.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The call to “remember the days of old” emphasizes the importance of historical consciousness in Judaism. As the Ramban (Nachmanides) points out in his commentary on Deuteronomy 32:7, this is not a mere command to recall past events, but an exhortation to reflect on the purpose and lessons of history.

Understanding:

The division of the nations, as described here, reveals a profound concept. The Midrash, Bamidbar Rabbah 14:12, mentions that while nations have their celestial patrons, Israel’s portion is directly under HaShem. This direct connection to the Divine ensures Israel’s unique role and destiny among the nations.

Secrets:

The term “Jacob is the lot of His inheritance” holds kabbalistic depth. In the Zohar (2:158b), Jacob is identified with the sefirah of Tiferet. Just as Tiferet harmonizes and unifies the upper sefirot, Jacob represents the synthesis of his forefathers, Abraham (Chesed) and Isaac (Gevurah). Thus, Israel’s role is to bring balance and unity in the divine plan, acting as a conduit between the heavens and the earth.

Proofs:

  • Ramban on Deuteronomy 32:7.
  • Midrash Bamidbar Rabbah 14:12.
  • Zohar, 2:158b.

Lesson 4: Deuteronomy 32:10-12

“He found him in a desert land, and in a waste, a howling wilderness; He encircled him, He cared for him, He kept him as the apple of His eye. As an eagle that stirs up her nest, hovers over her young, spreads her wings, takes them, bears them on her pinions; so HaShem alone did lead him, and there was no foreign god with him.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The imagery of a desert signifies a place devoid of spiritual sustenance, reminiscent of Israel’s wanderings and their total reliance on HaShem. Rabbeinu Bechaye, in his commentary on this verse, explains that just as one who finds a precious object in the desert cherishes it because of its rarity, so too does HaShem cherish Israel amidst the spiritual barrenness of the world.

Understanding:

The metaphor of the eagle is rich in meaning. Rashi, in his commentary on Deuteronomy 32:11, describes the unique care of the eagle for her offspring. Unlike other birds, the eagle carries its young on its back to protect them from predators. Similarly, during the Exodus, HaShem protected Israel from above, shielding them from all harm.

Secrets:

The Kabbalistic work, the Zohar (3:233a), elucidates on the phrase “apple of His eye.” The “eye” symbolizes the sefirah of Hochma (wisdom), from which all emanations flow. The “apple” or pupil is the point from which one perceives, implying that Israel holds a central role in the divine plan, and through them, the light of Hochma is channeled to the world.

Proofs:

  • Rabbeinu Bechaye on Deuteronomy 32:10.
  • Rashi on Deuteronomy 32:11.
  • Zohar, 3:233a.

Lesson 5: Deuteronomy 32:13-15

“He made him ride on the high places of the earth, that he might eat the produce of the fields; He made him suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the flinty rock; cream of cattle, and milk of sheep, with fat of lambs, and rams of the breed of Bashan, and goats, with the fat of kidneys of wheat; and of the blood of the grape you drank wine. But Jeshurun grew fat, and kicked—you have grown fat, you have grown thick, you are covered with fatness; then he forsook God who made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The term “Jeshurun” is an endearing name for Israel. The Talmud in Brachot 7b explains it as a contraction of “yashar” (upright) indicating Israel’s inherent righteousness. However, these verses portray a transition from divine favor to the dangers of complacency.

Understanding:

The bounty described in these verses serves as both a blessing and a test. The Mechilta on Exodus 15:2 points out that prosperity can be more challenging than adversity. The very blessings bestowed upon Israel became a stumbling block, leading them away from the Source of their blessings.

Secrets:

In the realm of Kabbalah, specifically in the Sefer Yetzirah (4:6), the phrase “honey out of the rock” hints at the flow of divine sustenance from the highest realms (rock) to our tangible world (honey). The juxtaposition of opposites – honey and rock, oil and flint – signifies the ability of HaShem to bring forth sweetness and light from the seemingly impenetrable and harsh.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Tractate Brachot 7b.
  • Mechilta on Exodus 15:2.
  • Sefer Yetzirah, 4:6.

Lesson 6: Deuteronomy 32:16-18

“They provoked Him to jealousy with foreign gods; with abominations they provoked Him to anger. They sacrificed to demons, which are not God; to gods they did not know, to new gods, new arrivals that your fathers did not fear. Of the Rock who begot you, you are unmindful, and have forgotten God who formed you.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

These verses emphasize the grave error of replacing the Eternal with transient and false gods. The Midrash in Devarim Rabbah 11:6 paints a vivid analogy, likening this act to a prince who, having lost his way, asks peasants for direction, forsaking his royal father’s guidance.

Understanding:

The description of unfamiliar gods as “new arrivals” underscores the fleeting nature of these deities compared to the everlasting God. Rambam, in his Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Avodah Zarah 1:1, stresses that while these deities seemed new and appealing, they were devoid of true power and substance.

Secrets:

Kabbalistically, the phrase “Of the Rock who begot you” is intriguing. In the Zohar (1:61b), the term “Rock” denotes the sefirah of Binah, often associated with the divine attribute of understanding and the supernal womb from which souls emanate. Israel’s neglect of this divine root is not merely a rejection of a higher power but a forgetting of their very spiritual essence and origin.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Devarim Rabbah 11:6.
  • Rambam, Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Avodah Zarah 1:1.
  • Zohar, 1:61b.

Lesson 7: Deuteronomy 32:19-21

“And HaShem saw, and He spurned, because of the provocation of His sons and His daughters. He said: ‘I will hide My face from them; I will see what their end will be; for they are a perverse generation, children in whom there is no faithfulness. They have roused Me to jealousy with a non-god; they have provoked Me with their vanities; and I will rouse them to jealousy with a non-people; I will provoke them with a vile nation.’”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The act of HaShem “hiding His face” alludes to the concept of “Hester Panim,” moments in history where divine providence seems concealed. The Talmud in Chullin 139b suggests that even in these moments, the Divine Presence is still present, albeit hidden, and awaiting our return.

Understanding:

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on this verse, offers a profound insight: The gravest danger isn’t when God punishes, but when He withdraws, leaving us to the consequences of our choices. The notion of being aroused to jealousy with a “non-people” implies that the very things Israel sought in other nations would be the cause of their own downfall.

Secrets:

The Zohar (2:32b) delves into the mystical underpinnings of “Hester Panim.” In Kabbalistic thought, the Shekhinah, or Divine Presence, never truly abandons Israel. Yet, our actions can create barriers, symbolized by veils or curtains, which obscure the light of the Shekhinah. When we engage with “vanities,” we add layers, distancing ourselves further from the divine radiance.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Tractate Chullin 139b.
  • Commentary of Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch on Deuteronomy 32:20.
  • Zohar, 2:32b.

Lesson 8: Deuteronomy 32:22-24

“For a fire is kindled in My nostril, and burns to the depths of the netherworld, and devours the earth with her produce, and sets ablaze the foundations of the mountains. I will heap evils upon them; I will spend My arrows upon them. They shall be wasted with hunger, and devoured with burning heat and bitter destruction; and the teeth of beasts will I send upon them, with the venom of crawling things of the dust.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The imagery of fire represents divine anger, yet it’s essential to understand that this “anger” is not like human emotion but a mechanism of divine justice. As the Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 3, elaborates, it is a corrective measure, seeking to purify and bring back those who have strayed.

Understanding:

Rabbi Avraham ibn Ezra, in his commentary on Deuteronomy 32:23, observes that the term “arrows” symbolizes various forms of punishments. They are described as “My arrows,” indicating that even in punishment, there’s a divine purpose, guiding the individual and nation back to the righteous path.

Secrets:

In Kabbalistic terms, especially as noted in the Zohar (2:64a), the “depths of the netherworld” can be linked to the sefirah of Malkhut in its state of constriction, where divine light is restricted. This constriction happens when negative actions in the world below prevent the free flow of divine energy from the higher realms.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 3.
  • Commentary of Rabbi Avraham ibn Ezra on Deuteronomy 32:23.
  • Zohar, 2:64a.

Lesson 9: Deuteronomy 32:25-27

“Outside, the sword shall bereave, and in the chambers, terror; both young man and virgin, the suckling with the man of gray hairs. I said I would scatter them into corners, I would make the remembrance of them cease from among men; Were it not that I dreaded the enemy’s provocation, lest their adversaries should misdeem, lest they should say: ‘Our hand is exalted, and not HaShem has done all this.'”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The verses portray a chilling scene of devastation. However, even amidst this grim picture, the Divine Compassion emerges. The Talmud, in Berakhot 32b, elucidates that even during times of distress, God’s protective presence remains with Israel.

Understanding:

The fear expressed in verse 27 is not a divine fear for oneself, but rather a concern about a misperception in the world. Ramban (Nachmanides) on Deuteronomy 32:27 clarifies that HaShem’s concern is that other nations might mistakenly attribute Israel’s misfortunes to their own might rather than understanding them as divine rebuke.

Secrets:

From the Kabbalistic viewpoint, as drawn from the Zohar (3:176b), the scattering of Israel can be seen as sparks of divine light being dispersed throughout the world. Despite the suffering, this dispersion allows for a global elevation when these sparks are gathered and elevated through the deeds of the Jewish people in exile.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Tractate Berakhot 32b.
  • Commentary of Ramban on Deuteronomy 32:27.
  • Zohar, 3:176b.

Lesson 10: Deuteronomy 32:28-30

“For they are a nation void of counsel, neither is there any understanding in them. If they were wise, they would understand this; they would discern their latter end. How should one chase a thousand, and two put ten thousand to flight, unless their Rock had sold them, and HaShem had delivered them up?”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The verses address the lack of discernment within the nation and emphasize the consequences of this neglect. The Midrash, Sifrei Devarim 320, comments that had the nation truly comprehended the divine blessings and protection they enjoyed, they would never have strayed from the path of the Torah.

Understanding:

The rhetorical question in verse 30 underscores the impossibility of such a small group being overcome unless there was divine intervention. Rabbi David Kimchi (Radak) on Deuteronomy 32:30 delves into this idea, indicating that the nation’s downfall is not due to its enemies’ strength but due to their own abandonment of the divine covenant.

Secrets:

Kabbalistically, as per the teachings of the Zohar (1:178b), the term “Rock” often denotes the sefirah of Yesod, the channel of divine flow into the world. When this connection is severed through our misdeeds, the protective flow diminishes, leading to the experiences portrayed in these verses.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Sifrei Devarim 320.
  • Commentary of Radak on Deuteronomy 32:30.
  • Zohar, 1:178b.

Lesson 11: Deuteronomy 32:31-33

“For their rock is not as our Rock, even our enemies themselves being judges. For their vine is of the vine of Sodom, and of the fields of Gomorrah; their grapes are grapes of gall, their clusters are bitter. Their wine is the venom of serpents, and the cruel poison of asps.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The juxtaposition of “their rock” and “our Rock” points to a fundamental difference between the values of Israel and those of the nations. The Midrash in Devarim Rabbah 11:7 emphasizes this distinction, suggesting that while other nations rely on transient powers, Israel’s strength lies in their eternal connection to HaShem.

Understanding:

The allegory of a vine from Sodom portrays the moral degradation of the nations. As elaborated by Ibn Ezra on Deuteronomy 32:32, such a vine, rooted in a place of wickedness, can only produce fruit of bitterness and malevolence.

Secrets:

In the Zohar (3:58a), there’s an exploration of the vine as a spiritual construct. It alludes to the sefirah of Tiferet, which harmonizes divine compassion and judgment. The vine of Sodom, in contrast, signifies an imbalance, where divine judgment and harshness overwhelm without the mitigating factor of divine compassion.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Devarim Rabbah 11:7.
  • Commentary of Ibn Ezra on Deuteronomy 32:32.
  • Zohar, 3:58a.

Lesson 12: Deuteronomy 32:34-36

“Is not this laid up in store with Me, sealed up in My treasuries? Vengeance is Mine, and recompense, for the time when their foot shall slip; for the day of their calamity is at hand, and the things that are to come upon them shall make haste. For HaShem shall judge His people, and relent for His servants; when He sees that their power is gone, and there is none remaining, bond or free.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The concept of divine retribution being “laid up in store” conveys that God’s justice, though at times seemingly delayed, is precise and inevitable. Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 9, describes this as the Divine ledger, where every deed, good or bad, is noted and accounted for.

Understanding:

Rabbi Ovadia Sforno on Deuteronomy 32:36 gives insight into the depth of HaShem’s compassion. Despite the described punishments, when God perceives the utter helplessness of His people, He intervenes with mercy, indicating the balance of divine justice and compassion.

Secrets:

The term “their power is gone” is resonant with Kabbalistic thought. The Zohar (2:32b) equates this power with the divine sparks within the Jewish soul. When these sparks are diminished due to misdeeds, the protective sheath surrounding Israel weakens. Yet, HaShem’s intervention symbolizes the restorative power of Teshuva (repentance), reconnecting these sparks to their divine source.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 9.
  • Commentary of Sforno on Deuteronomy 32:36.
  • Zohar, 2:32b.

Lesson 13: Deuteronomy 32:37-39

“He will say: ‘Where are their gods, the rock in which they sought refuge? Who ate the fat of their sacrifices, and drank the wine of their drink offering? Let them rise up and help you, let them be your protection! See now that I, even I, am He, and there is no god with Me; I kill and I make alive, I wound and I heal, and there is none that can deliver out of My hand.'”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The verses express the futility of seeking shelter in false gods. The Gemara in Sanhedrin 63b describes the tragic error of those who, blinded by their desires, place faith in entities that neither benefit nor harm.

Understanding:

Rambam (Maimonides) in his Guide for the Perplexed (1:36) provides a philosophical exploration of these verses. He emphasizes that the ultimate reality is the existence of HaShem alone, and that any deviation from this understanding leads to spiritual and material suffering.

Secrets:

The words “I, even I, am He” have profound Kabbalistic significance. As the Zohar (2:245a) elucidates, they hint at the upper and lower unity, representing the interconnectedness of the divine emanations, the sefirot, in their perfect harmony.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Tractate Sanhedrin 63b.
  • Rambam, Guide for the Perplexed 1:36.
  • Zohar, 2:245a.

Lesson 14: Deuteronomy 32:40-42

“For I lift up My hand to heaven, and say: As I live forever, if I whet My glittering sword, and My hand take hold on judgment; I will render vengeance to My adversaries, and will recompense them that hate Me. I will make My arrows drunk with blood, and My sword shall devour flesh; with the blood of the slain and the captives, from the long-haired heads of the enemy.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The gesture of lifting a hand to heaven is a powerful affirmation of divine authority. Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 12, discusses this as an illustration of the immutable nature of God’s decrees, a testament to the enduring and eternal nature of HaShem’s dominion over the universe.

Understanding:

The “glittering sword” is an emblem of divine judgment. Rashi, in his commentary on Deuteronomy 32:41, suggests that this sword, once unsheathed, does not return empty. This points to the precision and inevitability of divine justice.

Secrets:

The notion of “My arrows drunk with blood” delves deep into the mystical. The Zohar (3:248a) describes these arrows as channels of divine judgment. They represent aspects of the sefirot of Gevurah, the divine attribute of restriction and judgment, executing divine will with precision and finality.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Tanchuma, Ha’azinu 12.
  • Rashi’s Commentary on Deuteronomy 32:41.
  • Zohar, 3:248a.

Lesson 15: Deuteronomy 32:43-45

“Rejoice, O nations, with His people; for He will avenge the blood of His servants, and will render vengeance to His adversaries, and will make atonement for the land of His people. And Moses came and spoke all the words of this song in the ears of the people, he, and Hoshea the son of Nun. And Moses made an end of speaking all these words to all Israel.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The call for nations to rejoice with Israel signifies a future era where the world acknowledges Israel’s unique relationship with HaShem. The Midrash in Devarim Rabbah 10:8 paints a vision of the end of days, where nations celebrate the righteousness of Israel and their divine purpose.

Understanding:

Moses’ role in delivering this song, as elaborated by Ramban (Nachmanides) on Deuteronomy 32:44, is not just that of a prophet, but also as a guardian and shepherd, ensuring that every member of the nation internalized its profound teachings.

Secrets:

The act of “atonement for the land” carries esoteric significance. The Zohar (2:32b) sees the land as not just a physical entity, but also as the sefirah of Malchut, the final emanation that channels divine blessing into the world. Atonement, in this context, represents the purification and elevation of Malchut, enabling a seamless flow of divine light.

Proofs:

  • Midrash Devarim Rabbah 10:8.
  • Commentary of Ramban on Deuteronomy 32:44.
  • Zohar, 2:32b.

Lesson 16: Deuteronomy 32:46-48

“And he said unto them: ‘Set your heart unto all the words which I testify unto you this day, that ye may command your children to observe to do, all the words of this law. For it is not a vain thing for you; for it is your life, and through this thing ye shall prolong your days in the land, whither ye go over the Jordan to possess it.’ And HaShem spoke unto Moses that selfsame day, saying:”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

Moses’ urgent call for the people to “set your heart” indicates an emotional and introspective engagement with the Torah. This echoes the sentiments of the Mishnah in Avot 2:1, where Rabbi Judah HaNasi emphasizes the importance of reflecting upon one’s learnings.

Understanding:

The assertion that the Torah “is not a vain thing for you” emphasizes its indispensable role in the life of a Jew. Rambam (Maimonides) in his Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Teshuva 10:1, underscores the vitality of Torah, describing it as the blueprint for life and the path to true connection with HaShem.

Secrets:

The phrase “for it is your life” can be delved into deeply. The Kabbalistic work, Sefer Yetzirah (1:1), describes the Torah as the blueprint from which the world was carved. Every letter and word in the Torah is a channel of divine energy, and by engaging with it, one is essentially connecting with the primordial forces that sustain existence.

Proofs:

  • Mishnah, Avot 2:1.
  • Rambam, Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Teshuva 10:1.
  • Sefer Yetzirah, 1:1.

Lesson 17: Deuteronomy 32:49-52

“Go up into this mountain of Avarim, unto mount Nebo, which is in the land of Moab, that is over against Jericho; and behold the land of Canaan, which I give unto the children of Israel for a possession; And die in the mount whither thou goest up, and be gathered unto thy people; as Aaron thy brother died in mount Hor, and was gathered unto his people; Because ye trespassed against Me in the midst of the children of Israel at the waters of Meribath-kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified Me not in the midst of the children of Israel.”

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

Mount Nebo is not merely a geographical location but symbolizes the culmination of Moses’ journey. The Talmud in Sotah 13b narrates how Moses desired to enter the Promised Land, not for his own benefit, but to fulfill the commandments associated with it.

Understanding:

The episode at the waters of Meribath-kadesh, as explained by Ramban (Nachmanides) on Numbers 20:12, was a subtle flaw in the actions of two towering figures, Moses and Aaron. Their minor deviation from HaShem’s command reflected an imperfection, showing that even the greatest of leaders are held to the highest standards.

Secrets:

The notion of “sanctifying HaShem” has profound Kabbalistic depths. The Arizal (Rabbi Isaac Luria) in Shaar HaKavanot (Drushei Kiddush Hashem) describes it as the alignment of the sefirot and the harmonization of divine attributes. Moses and Aaron’s actions, in their profound spiritual stature, had cosmic implications that disrupted this alignment momentarily.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Sotah 13b.
  • Commentary of Ramban on Numbers 20:12.
  • Shaar HaKavanot, Drushei Kiddush Hashem by the Arizal.

Lesson 18: Reflection and Closing Thoughts on the Parashat

As we reach the end of Parashat Ha’Azinu, we’ve traversed a lyrical landscape rich in layers of meaning, insights, rebukes, and hope. This song is not merely a historical reflection, but a profound prophecy about Israel’s relationship with HaShem, their failings, and eventual redemption.

Hidden Meanings and Teachings:

The structure of the song mirrors the nature of the Jewish journey, starting from the recognition of God’s gifts, drifting into forgetfulness, facing the consequences, and finally witnessing divine compassion. The Talmud in Berachot 32a, highlights how our actions, both positive and negative, have a ripple effect, influencing our relationship with HaShem and the world around us.

Understanding:

While the Parashat contains rebukes, it concludes on a note of hope. The Meshech Chochmah on Deuteronomy 32:43 emphasizes the eventual acknowledgment by the nations of the world of Israel’s unique role, and how they will rejoice in the righteousness of the Jewish people.

Secrets:

Delving into the depths of Kabbalistic thought, the entire Parashat is seen as a flow from the sefirah of Binah (understanding) to Malchut (sovereignty), guiding us through a spiritual journey. The Zohar on Parashat Ha’Azinu (3:306a) elaborates on how the verses correspond to the divine channels, and by understanding and integrating their teachings, one can draw closer to HaShem.

Proofs:

  • Talmud, Berachot 32a.
  • Meshech Chochmah on Deuteronomy 32:43.
  • Zohar, Parashat Ha’Azinu, 3:306a.

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